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College of Arts and Sciences Department of Psychology

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What’s behind baby’s smile?

 

Baby in a blue hoodie

Study of U.S. and Dutch infants finds cultural norms influence temperament.

Read more in the Arts & Sciences newsletter CAS Connect

Psychology News

  • Graduate students win NSF research fellowships

    Three Washington State University College of Arts and Sciences students have been chosen for National Science Foundation graduate research fellowships. The prestigious awards have trained generations of American scientists and engineers, including Nobel laureates.

    The College of Arts and Sciences’ honorees are:

    Avery Anne Lane, an anthropology student from Tucson, Ariz., who is working on a master’s in Courtney Meehan’s biocultural anthropology lab.

    Shawn Trojahn, a biology master’s student from Virginia Beach, Va., who is looking at the global decline in biodiversity in the vulnerable mangrove forest, a habitat affected by logging and water pollution.

    Lindsey Marie Lavaysse, a psychology master’s student from San Francisco, … » More …

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  • Sahlin awards honor outreach, teaching, leadership, research

    Two members of the College of Arts and Sciences are among the four WSU faculty to receive the 2016-17 Sahlin awards at the Showcase Celebrating Excellence Recognition Banquet on March 31.

    Julie Kmec, Edward R. Meyer Distinguished Professor of Sociology, will receive the Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award for Instruction; and Craig Parks, professor of psychology and assistant vice provost, will receive the Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award for Leadership.

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  • John Wick Suffers Extreme Workplace Rage, Psychologist Says

    Revenge is a dish best served cold, and movie character John Wick has an ice cold touch. In both Keanu Reeves revenge films, Wick keeps getting pulled back into an underground world of organized crime despite his desires to live a normal life. This internal tug of war is at the core of Wick’s convictions, but it’s also at the root of the people who seek different kinds of revenge every day.

    “People want to teach somebody a lesson,” Thomas Tripp, a professor in the department of psychology at Washington State University, told Inverse. “If we don’t believe we’ve taught someone a lesson, we don’t … » More …

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  • How you perceive intelligence could affect your confidence

    What do you think about your own intelligence? Can you make yourself smarter over time, or are you stuck with the smarts you were born with? Your answer could reflect a key personality trait — namely, self-confidence — and whether you might want to help yourself to a big slice of humble pie.

    It turns out, if you view your brainpower as a fixed, innate capacity, you’re also more likely to be … overconfident. This was suggested in a recent three-part study led by Joyce Ehrlinger of Washington State University. It found that students with a so-called “fixed mind-set” were more likely to … » More …

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  • Online psychology degree ranks among nation’s best

    Washington State University recently was recognized for excellence in psychology education among colleges and universities nationwide.

    Affordable Colleges Online (ACO) ranked WSU’s online degree program in psychology among the 12 “Best Online Psychology Degrees for 2016.” Only one other Pac-12 school made the list of 50 top programs among the thousands of colleges offering online psychology degrees.

    “I am especially proud of the ranking because it reinforces for our students that they are in one of the premier programs in the nation, getting a quality education at an affordable price,” said Lee Daffin, clinical assistant professor of psychology in the College of … » More …

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